The Dance Floor Feels Like the Jobsite

My mom used to have her own event planning business and whenever I have tried to explain my line of work to people, I always used the parallels with her business. An event coordinator at a bar mitzvah is concerned with many of the same things that a project manager is concerned with on a construction project. While the two may seem like completely different things, both jobs require managing various people (whether they be a DJ or a structural engineer), controlling a budget, tracking a schedule, and ensuring that the final outcome meets everyone’s expectations.

I have a lot of people ask me when a construction project manager should get involved in a project. There are typically many players involved on a construction project: the brokers, the landlord, the tenant, the architect, the contractor, and consultants. As noted in a previous post, a project manager (or event coordinator!) need to join the team as soon as possible so relationships and expectation setting can be formed early.

I’ve always felt that 90% of the challenge on a construction project happens before the crews show up. Specifically, by having the project manager on board before the lease is signed, brokers and tenants will achieve a better outcome with the lease terms negotiated. A project manager can:

- Review various candidate suites for constructability

- Aid in preliminary design needs with architect to achieve goals

- Provide high-level budgets and schedules

- Develop work letter for lease and review all construction lease language prior to execution

When a project manager oversees a job based on lease language they helped form, a budget and schedule they helped set, and a team they assembled, you as the client should be able to party when the job is all over with.